e-days blog

e-days at the University of Lincoln

Authorby 19 January, 2011

AN ABSENCE MANAGEMENT CASE STUDY: THE UNIVERSITY OF LINCOLN

The Situation

It all started with the University of Lincoln introducing a new Managing Sickness Absence Policy.

This identified the need to support the organisation with the technology that could record sickness data accurately and in a timely manner. It also needed to provide accurate and detailed management information to inform the University Wellbeing programme.

The project represented a significant undertaking for the University and required coherent project management by their HR team, led by Sharron Croft.

The Requirement

The headline requirement was straight forward: provide a system that can efficiently capture, record and report absence information to provide management teams with the data required to support the new policy.
However within the headline requirement there were many specific needs relating to the precise functionality required by the University; complex working patterns, differing employment contracts, various absence types, multiple paths of authority, and so forth.

Ongoing support was also considered to be very important by the University.

The Solution

e-days was selected by the University of Lincoln because it provided a user-friendly interface combined with a powerful set of tools for recording and reporting absence data. Furthermore e-days had the flexibility necessary to reflect the unique structure and functionality requirements of the University.

e-days was deployed initially as a pilot project for a selected number of staff, which was subsequently expanded to all University staff following a successful trial.

The Result

The new sickness policy can be adhered to because the tools are now in place to capture and analyse the data as required. Absenteeism rates can be monitored, which means targets can be set and consequently performance can be assessed.

As the complete deployment is still in progress e-days will continue to work with the University of Lincoln to assess the improvement to absence rates in real terms.